You Can Now Book a Virgin Galactic Seat to Space — but It’ll Cost You

Space travel isn’t just coming. Space travel is here.

On Tuesday, Virgin Galactic announced that ticket sales will open to the general public on Feb. 16 for space flights taking place later this year. The open ticket sales, the company shared in a statement, will provide everyone with the chance to secure one of the first spaceflight reservations.

“At Virgin Galactic, we believe that space is transformational,” Michael Colglazier, the CEO of Virgin Galactic, said. “We plan to have our first 1,000 customers on board at the start of commercial service later this year, providing an incredibly strong foundation as we begin regular operations and scale our fleet.”

Snagging a Virgin Galactic spaceflight reservation will also give the recipient access to the Future Astronaut membership community, which Virgin Galactic noted, is designed to bring “inspiration, excitement, and adventure” from the flight itself and well beyond. Members will gain access to events, trips, and space-readiness activities both pre-and post-flight.

Spaceflight reservations will be available for $450,000. Those interested in traveling to space are asked to put down an initial deposit of $150,000 and make the final payment before their flight. See Virgin Galactic’s website for more information and to start your application process right now.

The flight itself departs from Virgin’s Spaceport America in New Mexico. Those taking part will arrive several days before the flight for training and a few bespoke itinerary activities, all while staying in private, world-class accommodations.

During spaceflight, guests can expect a 90-minute round-trip journey. Once in the air, the spaceship will gently flip so guests can experience several minutes of out-of-seat weightlessness and take in the breathtaking view of the Earth below from the ship’s 17 oversized windows.

To mark the launch of public sales, Virgin Galactic also unveiled a new consumer-facing brand, which it said is designed to capture the “love, wonder, and awe of the experience of viewing Earth from space, and to inspire generations of future astronauts around the world.”